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To the Grandest Man in 


the World 


-THE AMERICAN SOLDIER- 


this Book 


is Lovingly 


Dedicated. 



bn »• go 
to battle 



PEACEonEARTH«IIBERTX 



TO ALL SAMMIES ON LAND AND SEA 



Our *<') - diers love their coun 



ril.L KhAIJY 



iy kuy L. klkiim 0ur boys in France and Eng 

:r of " The Organ and the Choir* 




try, for its lion or they will fight 
land, for our Lib - er - ty will fight. 



Both day and night, they march a - long 

Our cause is just, so win we must 



to shield our stars and stripes- 

for Vn - cle Sam is right — 



All na - tions' 
A - cross the 




seas, shall be made free, Clear from coast to coast 

land, from strand to strand, Rings the bu - gle notes 



r or , tIie . U. S. A. now will clear the way, on ev' - ry man we boast. 

Uiainedand trou-bkd isles, they will be all smiles, where free -dom's ban - ner floats. 




F HALCYON 

(9THECLARINA. 
1NBIAN4POLIS. |ND 



Copyright MCMXVII by Halcyon Pub. Co., ft The CUnna, Indu n «poli».I n d. 

AMERICA'S GREAT WAR SONG, DEDICATED TO THE BOYS AT CAMP TAYLOR 



amp Zacnary Taylor 

SOUVENIR 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Edited by Maurice Dunn 



Published by LAMBERTSON SERVICE BUREAU 

406 Courier-Journal Building, Louisville, Ky. 
738 Lemcke Building, Indianapolis. Indiana 



PRICE ONE DOLLAR 



Major General Harry C. 
Hale is Commander of the 
84th Division, National Army, 
at Camp Zachary Taylor, 
Louisville, Kentucky. The 
division is composed of se- 
lected men from Indiana, 
Kentucky and Illinois. 

General Hale took command 
at Camp Zachary Taylor on 
the sixth day of October, 
1917, upon his arrival from 
China where he had been sta- 
tioned for two years. He is 
a most capable executive and 
has an unlimited capacity for 
work. He is a strict disci- 




plinarian but is absolutely im- 
partial and fair in administer- 
ing discipline. He was born 
in Knoxville, Illinois, July 10, 
1861; graduated from West 
Point at the age of eighteen 
with high honors. He served 
with distinction in the Indian 
and Philippine Wars and has 
since been assigned to some 
of the most important posts 
in the United States service. 
He recently returned from a 
visit to the European battle- 
fields with a message of good 
cheer for the people of the 
United States. 



OUR GENERAL 



General Hale's Message 



When Major General Hale returned from Europe he de- 
livered the following message to the officers and men of the 
Eighty-Fourth Division at Camp Taylor : 

To all Officers and Enlisted Men of the Lincoln Division : 

1. The Division Commander is glad to be back with his 
division and he notes with satisfaction many indications that 
during his absence the command has not been idle. 

2. Experience along the Western front confirms the already 
realized conception of the seriousness of our job and the neces- 
sity for great and continuous effort required for the successful 
accomplishment of our ends. 

3. I take this occasion to impress upon the officers the mag- 
nitude of their responsibilities under present conditions. You 
are responsible not only for the lives of your men, but also 
for the success of our arms. In order that you may fulfill 
your duties you will have to continuously and conscientiously 
study thoroughly every ramification of your complex profes- 
sion. The education of an officer cannot be completed in a 
training camp. There he receives but elementary instruction. 
To perfect his military education he must take advantage of 
every opportunity which offers for military enlightenment. 

4- To both officers and enlisted men I wish to emphasize the 
absolute necessity for the development and maintenance of a 
high discipline throughout every unit of the command. The 



peculiar features of the war now being fought are such as to 
have rendered more vitally important than before the existence 
of perfect discipline as an essential to success. This is the 
first great factor in the absence of which all our military drill 
and maneuver will have been in vain. And this discipline must 
be a discipline not only for the parade, but it must be a dis- 
cipline that enters into the very character of the man — it must 
be a discipline moral, mental and physical. 

5. Your comrades abroad and your allies on all the fronts 
are looking forward to your arrival and assistance. This 
should be a stirring thought, but it carries with it the immense 
responsibility that rests upon you. Upon your training, your 
discipline and your efficiency will not only you yourselves, but 
the great country to which you belong be weighed and judged 
by those allies and by the world at large. 

6. Let us keep before us then the two main objects of our 
lives at this time — the first to confront the enemy, the second 
to defeat him. And let us realize that to attain these ends the 
stern necessity of constant and continuous work is forced upon 
us. This is no holiday time. Every true American can be 
content these days only when he is at work, and that work in 
the interest of his country. 

HARRY C. HALE, 
Major General N. A., Commanding Eighty-Fourth Division. 




SELECTED MEN ARRIVE AT THE CAMP 







Camp Zachary Taylor 

By Maurice Dunn 

(Accredited Correspondent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky.) 



Six months ago Jefferson County, Kentucky, contained 
within its borders the largest city in the state. Today it em- 
braces the two largest and must important communities in 
Kentucky. < >ne is Louisville and the other is Camp Zachary 
Taylor, one of the sixteen cantonments erected for the instruc- 
tion of the nation's selected army. 

( )]' the two it is easily conceivable that Camp Zachary Tay- 
lor is the more important, hi its wellbeing are entwined the 
heart strings of the families of three stall's. Kentucky. Indiana 
and Illinois. It is from these states that the inhabitants of the 
new city are drawn. Forty thousand who were formerly scat- 
tered through the cities, villages and countryside of the three 
states are today entering the preliminary stages of a new life. 
mingling in the close communion of a new brotherhood; an 
order which has vowed not to return to the old life until the 
objects for which they left home have been attained. 

Camp Zachary Taylor was not a wilderness yesterday. It 
sprang out of the most arable soil in the vicinity of Louisville. 
Its products played a great part in feeding the metropolis of 
the -tale. But today the cornstalks that waved over the hun- 
dreds of acres have been replaced by so many rifles; farm 
houses and barns have given way to headquarters and barracks 
and the regular trim rows of potato vines have been succeeded 
by clean, while ribbons of paralleling streets. Dirt footpaths 



and rutted wagon roads have been erased to make way for 
macadam and asphalted pikes, the surfaces of which refuse to 
hold water. A street car line which penetrates into the middle 
of the cam]) is built over the graves of vegetable beds ancl the 
vanished sod of pasture land. In short, a pastoral idyl has 
been completely painted out bv the brush of a military artist. 

Louisville Selected. 

It was on a Monday afternoon on June II, 1917, that a tell- 
ing message came over the wires nominating Louisville for 
one of the sixteen cantonments. For weeks before committees 
of the Louisville Board of Trade headed by Mr. Fred M. 
Sackett bad worked hard in laying their offer before the gov- 
ernment in an effort to obtain one of the camps. It was a joy- 
ful day to all of Louisville when she learned that she had been 
one of the lucky ones. 

Camp Zachary Taylor is located just Southeast of the 
Southern border of Louisville. It is reached by two main 
arteries of traffic, the Preston street road and the Poplar Level 
road. Along the former runs a street car line that was ex- 
tended from the city and which affords excellent service. The 
center of the camp skirts along the Poplar Level road to almost 
the Eastern Parkway and is an ideal road for automobile 
traffic The big home for the fighting sons of democracy has a 




DRAFTED MEN BEFORE GETTING UNIFORMS 



total acreage of 2,730.72 acres. It is divided as follows : Main 
camp, i,i5 I -39: "0 s P ital group, 105.56; warehouse group, 
36.73; maneuver field, 1,234: parade triangle, 31.53, and ci- 
vilian group, 90.61. Nearly fourteen miles of smooth roadway 
traverse the soldier city. 

In the camp there are 1,450 buildings, of which 365 are 
barrack buildings, the sleeping and living quarters of some 
44.000 soldiers. When the camp is fully operated, 1 1 ,000 ani- 
mals are quartered at the Remount Station. From the head- 
quarters of the Eighty-Fourth Division at Camp Zachary Tay- 
lor, located at Poplar Level road and Taylor avenue, is 6.9 
miles to the Jefferson County court house at Fifth and Court 
Place. It is 6.7 miles to the Rifle Range from the same head- 
quarters. This summer will be marked by the booming guns 
on an Artillery Range situated between West Point and Eliza- 
bethtown, Ky., a distance of twenty miles from Louisville. Here 
long leases have been taken on 18,000 acres of land, of ample 
size to fire field pieces at actual targets. 

Made Quick Work. 

Just fourteen days after the announcement was made that 
Louisville had secured the camp site, the contract was let to 
Mason & Hanger, a Kentucky firm. Major Frank E. Lam- 
phere, U. S. R. C, became the constructing quartermaster and 
-Mr. James B. Wilson, the chief engineer of the Louisville 
Water Company became the chief engineer. 

On June 25 the first stake for the first building was driven. 
At the time of the writing of this narrative construction is still 
in progress on many buildings, including a medical officers' 
quarters and medical enlisted personnel barrack buildings, ad- 



ditional wards to the Base Hospital, besides a rest room for 
convalescent soldiers erected by the Red Cross and the Y. M. 
C. A. 

Some idea of the size of the task is had when it is con- 
sidered that for Camp Zachary Taylor there were required 25,- 
000,000 feet of lumber, 1,700,000 square feet of wall board, 
37,000 window sashes, 32,000 square feet of prepared roofing, 
37,000 square feet of wire screening, 6,457 solid board doors 
and 2,665 kegs of nails. For the water supply 85,000 feet of 
pipe ranging in diameter from one to twelve inches had to be 
secured and laid; for the sewers over 100,000 feet of pipe of 
varied sizes. At the first temporary homes for several thou- 
sand workmen had to be provided. 

The plans for the completion of the camp called for Sep- 
tember 1 and predictions were frequent that this was impos- 
sible. But behind the work there was the tremendous driving 
force of necessity led by Major Lamphere, who is accus- 
tomed to speed in construction. The government had the 
absolute cooperation of every trade. Many Louisville firms 
and others in the vicinity turned aside from other contracts to 
furnish the materials needed in record time and the railroads 
gave these materials priority over their lines. 

Material Required. 

Here are a few of the articles that were bought from Louis- 
ville firms for the construction of the camp: Twenty-eight 
thousand square feet of roofing: twenty car loads of nails and 
hardware; twenty car loads of plumbing, 192 car loads of 
tanks, heaters and stoves, ranges, pipes, electrical equipment. 




MARCHING THROUGH THE STREETS OF LOUISVILLE ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY— REAL SOLDIERS AFTER SIX 

MONTHS' SERVICE 



IO 



refrigerators and the like; railroad material for five miles of 
track 114 car loads of ballast, ten car loads of electric light 
ndles and 175 car loads of sand. Those are a few of the 
things that are required to make complete the home for the 
comfort and health of the soldiers from three states. 

Camp Zachary Taylor was built to hold one complete di- 
vision plus certain additional units such as the One Hundred 
and Fifty-Ninth Depot Brigade, the Quartermaster Corps, 
Base Hospital, the Seventeenth Regular Brigade, recruit depot 
and many other smaller organizations that when at full strength 
will bring its population to nearly 44,000 men. 

Good architects designed the barracks that are now the tem- 
porary homes of these sons of three states. But they were not 
allowed 10 exercise any of the flights so dear to the professional 
house planner's heart. Instead they were ordered to a most 
rigid simplicity. In this they have succeeded decidedly. 

The barrack buildings of the camp are uniformly forty- 
three feet in width and from 200 to 250 feet in length. Upon 
their ground floor a broad hall with a door at each end divides 
them across the middle. At one side of this hall is the mess 
room, its backless benches designed to seat the entire company 
at a single time. There is an open kitchen at one end of tnis 
room with a serving counter which helps keep the hungry 
rookie from overwhelming friend cook and his helpers. 

Up to this counter three times a day march the soldier 
boys, meat pans and drinking cups in hand. When both are 
filled it is back to these benches and the long pine tables which 
front them. The tables are bare, of course. Simplicity and 
speed. The writer of the narrative was talking to a quarter- 



master during the early days of the camp construction when 
he said : 

"Do you see those half-inch cracks between the planks?" 
I saw the cracks and thought some contractor was going to be 
damned for his carelessness. 

"My idea," said my friend, "I beat the sanitary officer to it 
for once. If we had built those tables with green boards close 
together the lumber would have dried out and there would 
have been cracks to catch the food crumbs. That is one of the 
forethoughts from the very start, to make Camp Zachary Tay- 
lor a healthy place in which to live. This little precaution will 
be one of the preventers of .Mr. Fly during the summer 
months," concluded the officer. 

"Sanitary officer is a sort of a bogy man around here," I 
ventured. But the officer was really serious when he replied: 
"He is the man to talk about. Everybody believes him and he 
has done wonders. He got rid of the mosquitoes and for miles 
around the camp ponds and streams have been oiled." 

A Real Benefit. 

You, my friend, can be sure that never was such painstak- 
ing care exercised in making this home for soldierly instruc- 
tion healthful for the man in uniform. And if your boy is one 
of the many thousand, the benefit is going to be his in more 
ways than I can tell here. 

I have described the general plan of the home of your sol- 
dier and will tell you something about where he sleeps. 

The second floor of the barrack building and parts of the 
first are used for sleeping quarters for about two hundred men. 




II 




REVIEW OF THE PARADE ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 
Mayor Smith of Louisville; Brig. Gen. Wilbur Wilder; Mayor Galvin of Cincinnati; Brig. Gen. Frank D. Webster. 



12 





I these two big rooms the boys bunk, their neat iron cots as 
• a fire house. Each man is given 500 cubic feet of air for 
his own, so that the cots are not too near each other. The 
barracks are lighted by electricity and great stoves are used to 
heat the buildings. The officers' quarters are heated by steam 
drawn from small heating plants in the rear of the buildings. 

The officers' quarters, a single story in height, are similar 
in general construction to the barracks. The men at Camp 
Zachary Taylor are thoroughly democratic. Your boy or any 
other boy will be sure to have the same treatment, the same 
housing, the same fare when they reach this cantonment. There 
are neither bulldogs nor privately kept motor cars here. It is 
theoretical democracy reduced to plain hard practice. 

As I said before, the camp was built for one full division 
and many other units. When this was written there was the 
skeleton organization of a division in training at the camp. A 
division at Camp Zachary Taylor consists of four regiments 
of infantry, three regiments of artillery, two of which are 
light artillery and the other motorized heavy artillery; three 
machine gun battalions, a field signal battalion, four train, 
supply, ammunition, sanitary and headquarters troop and mili- 
tary police, three brigade headquarters, the division head- 
quarters and its staff. The infantry regiments are composed 
of 250 men to a company with twelve companies to a regiment. 
< ine machine gun company of 200 men and smaller organiza- 
tions known as the headquarters and supply companies and 
medical detachments. The artillery regiments are made up of 
six batteries of 190 men each, while the engineers' regiment 
has 1,098 men and officers. 



What It Cost Uncle Sam. 

This military city for the soldiers has been a center of great 
activity and Uncle Sam has spent close to $6,000,000 in con- 
structing it. The number of employes working on it one week- 
jumped to 10,000 men and special trains were required to carry 
the men to and from the camp to their homes in the city. 

After ninety days of hard work, including Sundays, the 
first lots of drafted men reported for military duty on Sep- 
tember 5, 1917- I was one of several newspaper correspond- 
ents who witnessed the entrance of the first drafted men from 
the three states to pass into Camp Zachary Taylor. The honor 
went to Lester C. Monk, a twenty-two-year-old farmer from 
Jersey County, Illinois. It was just 9:03 o'clock on that Sep- 
tember morning when this young son of democracy became a 
member of the camp. Next came Ward H. McCormack, a 
Shriner from Bedford, Ind., the first Indianian to report, and 
soon afterwards came John Lee Herbert of 1717 Payne street, 
Louisville, and the first Louisville and Kentucky man to report 
for military service under the selective service law. 

These men were pleased with their reception and com- 
mented on how the stretches and surroundings of Camp Zach- 
ary Taylor impressed them. On that day these soldiers ate 
their first food in military life. The menu was palatable to all 
and consisted of sirloin steak with brown gravy, mashed po- 
tatoes, stewed tomatoes, peach roll, bread and butter and ice 
tea. That was the food the government served the selected 
man on that day. 



•3 




FIRST MAN EXAMINED IN KENTUCKY FOR THE DRAFT 



14 



School For Cooks. 

When these men first arrived the great problem was to feed 
them. Taking a lot of raw men strange to military service and 
make good cooks out of them offhand was an impossible thing. 
So the government enlisted the aid of many large hotel pro- 
prietors to recruit chefs and professional cooks to establish a 
cooks' and bakers' school for the training of men in the drafted 
army. Today there are young men who were in the selected 
lot who are excellent cooks and can prepare food with economy 
and make it palatable to the soldier. The graduates of the 
school were scattered out among the various regiments to carry 
their learning to others. 

The first human that faces a young soldier when he strikes 
the camp is always the medical officer. He gets acquainted 
with him before lie does with his captain. Because Uncle Sam 
insists on his children being protected against any disease that 
can be prevented. Then come the inoculations for typhoid, 
para-typhoid and vaccinations. Every soldier must take three 
injections of the vaccine, or as it is commonly called "shots." 
These inoculations come every ten days until three are gjyen. 
He must also be vaccinated until successful results have been 
obtained. 

The wonderful success of the inoculations as a preventive 
against typhoid at this cantonment is marked because not a 
single case of typhoid fever has developed since the camp 
opened. The same is true of small pox vaccinations. Not a 
case of small pox has been discovered where the man has been 
successfully vaccinated. 

I saw these young selects during the first days they spent 
at the camp and witnessed the start of their training. Today 



they do not appear to be the same men. 1 heard the follow- 
ing instructions given the raw recruits on the correct manner 
to stand at attention. This is the very first instruction given 
you in the army : The feet are turned out equally forming an 
angle of about forty-five degrees ; knees are kept straight ; 
without stiffness; hips drawn back slightly, body erect and 
resting equally on the hips; the chest is lifted and arched, 
shoulders squared and falling equally ; the arms and hands 
hang naturally with the thumbs along the seam of the trousers; 
head erect and squarely to the front ; eyes straight to the front 
and the body resting evenly on the heels and balls of the feet. 

The Salute. 

That's the set-up these soldiers learned before anything 
else, for it is the basis of all drills. Next came the mark of 
respect to the uniform. The salute. It was a common sight 
those days to see a lone soldier standing to one side learning 
individually the proper manner to bring his arm up with a 
snap and bring it down just as sharply. 

In those first days I wondered if it was hard work. It is. 
There are sore arms, the legs ache, the feet become sore and 
blistered and the whole body seems weary and tired. But the 
men soon learned to execute the commands with perfect ease. 
Drilling hardens the muscles and the aches quickly disappeared. 

No, dear mothers, you have no cause to worry, for out at 
this camp they are making strong and stalwart men out of 
weaklings. 

Here is the daily routine of a day's work in this camp. You 
can readily see there is not much time for any loafing. It pre- 



15 




FIRST INDIANA MAN REPORTING TO HIS UNIT 



16 



vails every day with exception of Wednesday, Saturday and 
Sunday: 

Reveille 5 45 a. m. 

Assembly 6 .00 a. m. 

Breakfast 6 130 a. m. 

Sick call 7 :oo a. m. 

First drill call 7:20 a. m. 

Assembly drill call 7 130 a. m. 

Recall 1 1 130 a. m. 

Mess call 12 :oo noon 

First call afternoon drill 12 :SO p. m. 

Assembly for drill 1 :oo p. m. 

Recall 5 :oo p. m. 

Retreat 5 .30 p. m. 

Supper 5:35 p. m. 

Tattoo (call to quarters ) 9 130 p. 111. 

Taps 10 :30 p. m. 

You can see how busy the soldier lad is during his eight 
hours of the twenty-four. Of course he is not only out learn- 
ing the formations in extended order and closed drill. As he 
lived longer in the camp there was formed many schools, each 
that gives instruction for every angle of military training for 
the modern soldier. Even the physicians that gave up their 
civil practice have daily schools and devote a greater number 
of their nights to careful study of modern surgery and sanita- 
tion, many new points that have been developed by the great 
war. It is all done so that the fighting forces of the United 
States may be fully protected by the most modern methods to 
preserve their health and lives. 



The Sanitary Train. 

The friends and relatives of the soldiers of the Eighty- 
Fourth Division can rest assured that when the division does 
its bit on the front line it will be protected by an able and ef- 
ficient ambulance corps. There is assigned to the Sanitary 
Train, a tactical unit of the division, two ambulance companies 
officered by capable officers and a fine personnel of enlisted 
men. These companies have already won laurels many miles 
from the battle line by their thorough and valiant service in the 
caring and handling of a railroad wreck that cost forty-nine 
lives near Louisville. 

So that every soldier will learn the best method to beat the 
brutal Hun every man is detailed to a school of some kind. 

This includes the intensive training with the bayonet, the 
grenade and machine guns. The bayonet and grenade work 
is considered two of the important phases of the modern school 
of fighting. The officers and men alike are detailed as students 
to this class, which is a sub-class of the Infantry School of 
Arms. Here they are taught the fine points of bayonet work 
under the eye of graduates of the Cambridge School of Bayo- 
net Work. 

The classes usually last about fifteen days. During the 
second week the classes are taken into the training trenches 
where there is actual combat with bayonets with the students 
wearing the safety plastron, steel gloves and wire helmets. 
These husky soldiers find it great fun to get down in the 
bottom of a trench and there fight a real battle with another 
soldier. Of course wooden bayonets are used but many are the 
telling blows that are given and taken by the participants. 
This class also has a French officer who has seen action and 
been wounded, who acts as an adviser to the chief instructor. 



17 




FIRST QUOTA OF SELECTED MEN FROM KENTUCKY ARRIVES AT THE CHUTES 



18 



The Grenade Class. 

The same can be said of the grenade class. Through the 
originality of Col. Hugh D. Wise, commandant of the school. 
Camp Zachary Taylor had the first live grenades in the coun- 
try. Smarting under tire delay the class was suffering in not 
having explosive grenades, Col. Wise constructed a grenade 
made of black powder and cement and had it made so that it 
would strike on a match box. In this manner the classes have 
had some valuable training in the "wafting" of these grenades 
in barrage fires and night raids. The physical culture class of 
this school should not be forgotten either. Here an able in- 
structor assisted by Packey McFarland, noted boxer, teach the 
men the manly art of self defense. This is not the only thing 
that is taught the men, however. Every sort of sport that will 
tend to make the men afraid of nothing and that will develop 
the muscles is indulged. They have a play hour each day the 
same as the rest of the division does. One hour each day the 
men are allowed to play baseball, football and handball, be- 
sides many other new games that help the man's physical fit- 
ness. 

In closing this narrative I may say that Camp Zachary 
Taylor is commanded by a man that has won his way into the 
hearts of his men, a man that in every sense is a true and brave 
soldier and one that the soldiers of the big camp should be 
proud of. That man is Major General Harry C. Hale, who 
came all the way from China to take command of the Eighty- 
Fourth Division. 

It has been shown that every possible care has been taken 
to safeguard the health of the men who are being trained in 
Camp Zachary Taylor. But to make a good soldier you must 
keep him happy as well as healthy, and to this side of the 



problem the War Department has devoted a great deal of at- 
tention. The Commission of Training Camp Activities is a 
voluntary body composed of men known in philanthropic work 
and social service, and on it devolves the task of watching the 
moral conditions in the environs of the camp and of reporting 
to the department at Washington when steps must be taken 
for their betterment. 

Entertainment Features. 

In Camp Zachary Taylor the sub-committee of the War 
Recreation Board works with the Y. M. C. A and other agen- 
cies in providing the young soldier with all forms of healthy 
recreation and amusement during the periods of training. 
Every regiment has its own buildings. Here writing material 
and reading matter is provided. Here educational classes 
under competent instructors are held and entertainments such 
as lectures and moving pictures are offered. In the main 
auditorium and Liberty Theater such entertainments are of- 
fered on a much larger scale. A number of well known the- 
atrical managers have arranged bookings of their best plays 
which are being sent to the camp for the benefit of the soldiers. 
Clean sports of all kinds are fostered, the outdoor games be- 
ing under the supervision of men prominent in the athletic 
world. 

Those who have been called to the colors, those whose hus- 
bands, whose sons and brothers must soon leave home to serve 
in their country's armies, will find cheer and comfort in the 
preparation that has been made for the wellbeing of our sol- 
diers in the first stages of their training that will not end until 
they have "gone over the top" in France. Certainly the gov- 
ernment has spared no effort to provide properly for them. 



19 






4 



urn X 

THUS ■« 

THEY CAME - 
5AD-GIAD-P0OR-RICH 
HOMELY AND HANDSOME — 
THE PICK or AMERICAN 
MANHOOD — 



THE FIRST THING UNCLE: 
5AM DID WAS TO HAND OUT 
A HOT MEAL- BUT IT 

WAS NOT LIKE 
MOTHERS 



EARLY ATTEMPTS AT 
THF 'ABOUT FACE' 
WERE VERY CONFU5ING- 




THE FIR5T NIGHTS SLUMBER 

ON .BARE .SPRIN&S 

HADE A DEEP IMPRESSION. 




THE ROOKIE IS 
EARLY INITIATED 
INTO THE MYSTER- 

'■»») IES OF K.P. 

**S*B PEELIN&3PUOS 
ISJbUT ONE. 




PARTIALLY ETQUIPPED 

THE EMBRYO 

SOLDIERS 

LINE UP 

FOR THE FIRST TIME 



THEN AND- 



20 




AND HANDLE A .BAYONET WITH 
AMAZJNfr FORCL" AND 
DEXTERITY. 



<K( 



IT WAS NOT MANY MOONS 
BEFORE THEY COULD DO 
'5QUAD5 RIGHT AND LEFT » 





AT FIRST 
COLD CHILLS 
CHASED 
UP AND DOWN 
THEIR x5PINE5 
WHEN THEY 
STOOD 5ENTIN4L 
ON A LONELY POST- 
JiUT NOT NOW. 




THE 

FINISHED 

PRODUCT— 

A 

PERFECT 

-SOLDIER. 



AMONG- THEIR MANY 
OTHER ACOMPLI5HMENT5 
THEY LEA-RNED TODI&- 
TRENCHS AND WITH- 
STAND 

\ HARDSHIP. 

' * \ 
\ 



r^ 




Jha^ 1 



NOW 



By Southworth, the Camp Cartoonist. 



21 




(Copyright by Catilield & Shook. Louisville, Ky.) 



STAFF OF THE 84TH DIVISION 



Reading from left to right: Capt. Rendeaue, Capt. Lulabie, both of French Army and instructors at Camp Taylor; Capt. Oscar 

Griswold, Aide-de-Camp to the General; Major George E. Turner, Division Ordnance Officer; Major Clarence 

Daugherty, Division Signal Officer; Lieut. Col. Gideon Blain, Judge Advocate; Col. J. Vanduyne, 

Division Quartermaster; Lieut. Col. Lawrence Halstead, Chief of Staff. 



22 




(Copyright by Caufield & Shook, Louisville, Ky.) STAFF OF THE 84TH DIVISION — (Continued) 

Reading from left to right: Major General Harry C. Hale; Major Walter Krueger, Chief of Operations; Lieut. Col. John H. Allen, 

Chief Surgeon; Major Phillip Matthews, Division Adjutant; Major J. J. Fulmer, Division Inspector; Capt. 

Willis H. Hale, Aide to the General; Lieut. Florent and Lieut. Meric, French Instructors. 



23 







THE AMBULANCE SECTION 



Reading from left to right: Capt. Floytl Roberts; Capt. McKinnon; Lieut. Tyrensenski; Lieut. Hyde; Lieut. Ganghorn; Capt. 
Jordan; Lieut. Zink; Lieut. Childs; Lieut. Chauvin; Capt. Larkin; Major Paul Fletcher; Lieut. Kline. 



24 



, 




THE AMBULANCE SECTION (Continued) 

Reading from left to right: Lieut. A. L. Linquist; Lieut. Lynn T. Hall; Lieut. Otis Martin; Lieut. Joseph Fleisohmann; Lieut. 
Lane; Capt. Beuker; Lieut. Corbett; Capt. E. A. Stevens; Capt. I. W. Dennaw; Lieut. Vallantyne; Capt. Armstrong. 



25 




FIRST BUNCH OF SELECTED MEN AT THE CHUTES 



26 




FIRST BUILDING ERECTED AT CAMP TAYLOR 



27 




COMPANY STREET AS CAMP IS COMPLETED 



28 







AT THE HEAD OF THE BIG PARADE IN LOUISVILLE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 



29 







30 



HOSPITAL STAFF OF THE BASE HOSPITAL 




BRIG. GEN. WILBUR WILDER AND LIEUT. COL. GIDEON BLAIN, JUDGE ADVOCATE, ADVISE A YOUNG OFFICER 




LIEUT. HAYE, CAPT. LULABIE AND LIEUT. ELORENT 
French oflfrcers at Camp Taylor. They wear the battle helmet of the Allies. 



32 










COOKS' AND BAKERS' SCHOOL— THE MEN WHO PREPARE THE FOOD FOR THE SOLDIER THOUSANDS 



33 




REAR VIEW OF BARRACK BUfLDTNGS 



34 




EX-PRESIDENT TAFT VISITS CAMP TAYLOR 
Reading from left to right: Mr. Taft; Brig. Gen. Daniel D. Devore; Lieut. Merle; Maj. 
cousin of the President; Capt. Willis E. Hale, and Phllo Dix, Y. M. C. A. 



A. E. Wilson, 



35 




BAYONET PRACTICE— COL. HUGH D. WISE AND CAPT. JOHN MENEFEE WATCH THE WORK 



36 







SATURDAY MORNING INSPECTION 



37 




JIMMIE DUNN TAKES A CLASS THROUGH SETTING-UP EXERCISES 



38 







t 



HAPPY WITH THE WEATHER 18 BELOW ZERO 



39 




MACHINE GUN DRILiL 



40 




CHECKERS— A CAMP SPORT 



41 




MAJOR HERBERT FOX EXAMINES SUSPECT FOR SPINAL MENINGITIS. THE WORK IS DONE THROUGH A GLASS 

SCREEN TO AVOID INFECTION 



42 







SAMMY AT THE WASHTUB— CLEANLINESS IS ONE OF THE TEN COMMANDMENTS IN CAMP 



43 







BAYONET TRENCHES 



44 




Y. M. C. A. SUPERINTENDENTS 



45 




BAYONET DRILL 



46 



V 1 










i . v> ■ -~* 


|^ ln,| .JtfL. ■ ^^* 






• 

• 


*▼*« IT 







THE SWEET NOTES OF THE MEGAPHONE BUGLE CAN BE HEARD TO THE REMOTEST CORNER OF THE MILITARY CITY 



47 







NO PLAY HERE— DIGGING TRENCHES 



48 




GBN. HALE WATCHES A GRENADE BARRAGE FIRE 



49 




TRENCH DIGGING IN THE BIG MANEUVER FIELD 



50 




JAZZ BAND OF THE AMBULANCE SERVICE 



Si 





■y \ «n 




^& ■ 7 ^ft ^* ^ 




1 a .* ' p^L 




It 1 







TIIROWINO, THR MEDICINE BAM.— FIELD DAY 



52 




READY FOR THE TUG-OF-WAR AT THE FIE1L1D MEET 



53 




UNING UP FOR CHOW 



54 



^H 







DISHES ARE QUICKLY WASHED 



55 




56 



MKS.S ON THE" SHADY SIDE 



i 




KITCHEN POJjTPE PBET.INO SPUDS 



57 







IN THE BARBER SHOP 



58 



J 







Telephone Work 
Mess By Has Lonesome 



Corp. Murphy, British Veteran, Exhibits 

German Hat Taken in Battle 
Brig. Gen. Devore and Lieut. Col. Gibson 




6q 



Sapho, Oerman Wolf Hound Cap- 
tured From The Bodies By 
Lieut. Meric. 



Philo Dix, Secretary of The 

Y. M. C. A. at Camp 

Taylor. 



Lester Monk Was The First Man 

To Report. He Came From 

Jersey City, Illinois. 




CAPT. SAMUEL D. JONES AND PACKEY McFARLAN'D 



Drill in Signalling, Important Feature of Camp Work 



61 



ff 



T^^ 


jT^J 


I—— -li ^ . 

K 


^f 1 mm 


1 *■ ' 




«IV 


1 *"* J i 

i BY 

| >•• J.VI 



Present Arms 
Parade Rest 



Port Arms 
Right Shoulder Arms 



Rifle Salute 
Order Arms 







Visiting Day and The Girl He Will Leave Behind 



Reading down steps: Capt. Rendeaue, French; Lieut. Stan- 
cliffe, British; Lieut. Meric, French; Lieut. Haye, 

French; Capt. Jeanes, British. g- 




Maj. Frank E. Lamnhere, Constructing Quartermaster 



Soldiers Must Have Good Teeth— The Regimental Dentist 



6 4 



r 



( 




A DARK SALUTE 



65 




GENERAL VIEW OF CAMP TAYLOR 



66 



t 




'ODD GLORY" JUST AFTER SHE WAS HOISTED OVER CAMP ZAOHARY TAYDOR 






6 7 



SOUVENIR BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

In appreciation of what Camp Zachary Taylor has meant to Louisville and vicinity, the following business firms 
and professional men of Louisville, New Albany and Jeffersonville gave their financial support to the souvenir. 



ACCOUNTANTS 
ElSCOTT & BARNETT; Public Accountants 

and Auditors; 716 Columbia Bldg. ; City 

8880; Main 837-A. 
HARRIS, HOMER F.; 20G Paul Jones Bldg.; 

City 117; Main 889-Y. 

ADDING MACHINES 
Comptometer 
FELT & TARRANT MFG. CO.; 1106-1107 
Republic Bldg.; City 21G2; O. L. Kestle, 
Mgr. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
B. F. AVERY & SONS, Incorporated; 7th 
and Mix. 

APARTMENT BUILDINGS 
BESTEN APARTMENTS; 214 Cherokee 

Road; Highland 24G. 
LESLIE, THE: Furnished Apartments; 506 

S. 3rd Ave.; City 839. 
WEISSINGER-GAULBERT APARTMENTS ; 

3rd and Broadway; City 3819; South 2980. 

AMUSEMENTS 
HAWIAN GARDEN; 662 S. 4th St.; Main 
1971-A. 

ARCHITECTS 
COLONS, VAL. P.; Paul Jones Bldg.; City 

5166. 
SMITH, ARTHUR R.; 3 Realty Bldg.; Citv 

3887; Main 661-A. 



TYLER, WM. C; 1310-1311 Lincoln Bldg.; 
City 1920; Main 1920. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 
NEVIAN, C. B., ART CO.; 319 W. Jefferson 
St; 200 Tyler Bldg.; City 3841. 

ATTORNEYS 

BROWN & TAYLOR; 723 W. Jefferson St.; 

City 9257. 
DACHER, FRANK; Kenyon Bldg.; City 697; 

Main 697. 
EISTON, M. D.; Paul Jones Bldg.; City 

8761. 
GREENE, L. D.; 1403 Inter-Southern Bldg.; 

Main 1G59-A. 

AUTOMOBILES 

BROWDER & HOSKINS CO.; •'Fords"; 
640 S. 3rd St.; City 3209; Main 1811. 

CALLAHAN-WHITESIDE MOTORS CO.; 
4th and York Sts.; South 262; City 1284. 

KENTUCKY & INDIANA TRUCK CO.; In- 
diana Motor Truck; 411 W. Green; City 
30G3; Main 3063. 

KENTUCKY DIXIE MOTOR CO.; Dixie 
Flyer & McFarland Six; 201 E. Broadway; 
Both Phones 1531. 

STUDBBAKER CORPORATION OF AMER- 
ICA; Passenger 'Oars and Trucks; Sales 
Rooms in:, w. Broadway; City 6900; Main 
1579. 

REPUBLIC VULCANIZING & WELDING 
CO.; 901 W. Jefferson; Main 1234-Y; City 
5207. 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRERS 

PORTLAND AUTO & GENERAL REPAIR; 
377 N. 26th St.; Shawnee 42. 

RICHARDS, ALBERT J.; Automobile Re- 
modeling and Painting ; Manufacturer of 
Carriages and Wagons; 632 W. Jefferson; 
Main 928; City 928. 

SOUTH LOUISVILLE MOTORS CO.; Tay- 
lor and Central; Parkway 34. 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES 

ARTT AUTO SUPPLY CO.; 2547 W. Market 
St.; Shawnee 90. 

AUTO EXCHANGE; 1064 Bardstown Road; 

Highland 1444. 
AUTO LAUNDRY & REPAIR SHOP; 213 

W. Kentucky St.; City G593. 
GLOSSBRENNBR xMOTORS CO.; 708 W. 

Broadway: Stulz Cars and G. M. C. 

Trucks: City 2540; South 185. 

KENTUCKY AUTO RADIATOR REPAIR 
CO.; 409 S. 1st St., bet. Green and Walnut; 
City 3944. We repair Auto Radiators sat- 
isfactorily. 

LOUISVILLE AUTO TOP CO.; Gill E. Broad- 
way; City 3841; Main 3G19-Y. 

AUTOMOBILE TIRES 

AUTOMOBILE NECESSITIES CO., THE; 
::i"i E. Broadway; Goodyear Tires and 
Goodyear Service; City 3266; Main 3266. 

QUICK TIRE SERVICE: 100 1 S. 3rd St.; 
South 1000 and 1001; City 2001 and tool. 



68 



AUTOMOBILE SPECIALTY 
MANUFACTURING 
OVBB MANUFACTURING CO.; 123 S. 12th 
St.; Oity 1152. 

AUCTIONEERS 

LEVENSON, JOS. A., & SON; 624 W. Main 
St.; City 2901. 

LOUISVILLE SALES CO.; 127 S. 6th St.; 
City 1640. 

BAKERS 

DECKMANN'S BAKERY & CONFECTION- 
ERY; 1264 S. Shelhy, corner Camp: City 

4098. 
HILS, L.; Bakery anil Confectionery; 417 S. 

Wenzel St.; City 4972. 
HUBER'S BAKERY & CONFECTIONERY: 

745 E. Jefferson St.; City 5142; 800 E. 

Walnut St.; City 2543. 
KILGUS, J. F.; 1496 S. Shelhy St.; City 2903. 
KISTLBR, JOS.: 1S24 Frankfort Ave.; City 

3542. 
PFEFFER, CHARLES F.j 1804 Bardstown 

Road; Highland 18. 
STEHL1N, JOHN H.; 1455 S. Preston St.; 

City S527: South 9125. 
TEBKEIN, J. L; 542 S. 12th St.; City 5479. 
WARRISSE, NICK; 2506 Griffiths; West 

842-A. 
WIEGANDT, GEO.; 1811 W. Broadway; 

S'hawnee 210S. 



BATTERY MANUFACTURERS 
(ELECTRICAL) 
LOUISVILLE STORAGE BATTERY CO.; 
726 S. 4th St.; City 3945; South 1157. 

BILLIARDS AND POOL 

LEIMKUEHLER, J. H.; 1515 Bardstown 
Road; Highland 369. 



SCHICK, FRED; 18th St. Road; West 
9165-A; Soft Drinks. 

WATTERSON HOTEL; Billiard Room; Wal- 
nut bet. 4th and 5th; City 5331. 

BIRDS AND POULTRY SUPPLIES 
HALLER'S PET SHOP & SUPPLY HOUSE; 
210 W. Market; City 2243. 

BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS 
BUETER, B. H.; 116 S. 1st St.; City 2365. 
KIEFER, JACOB; 1921 Colgan; Shawnee 

C17. 
LAMB, E. W.; 219 S. 7th St.; City 4796. 

BOILER MANUFACTURERS 

WALTON, C. J., & SON: 1 221 \V. Main St.; 

City 2884. 

BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERY AND 
PUBLISHERS 
BAPTIST BOOK CONCERN; 651) S. 4th St.; 
City 2980; Main 669-A. 

BOOTS AND SHOES 

STRENG-THALHEIMER SHOE CO., Incor- 

l>orated; Wholesale and Manufacturers; 

635 W. Main St.; City 50. 
BOSTON SHOE CO.; 417 and 419 S. 4th St.; 

Main 2623. 
WALK OVER BOOT SHOP; 309 S. 4th St.; 

City 9128. 

BOTTLES 

EPSTEIN, H.; 411 S. Floyd St.; City 6807. 

BOX MANUFACTURERS 
MBNGBL BOX CO.; 11th and Dumesnil St.; 
South 20. 



BREWERIES 

GRUBER & DEUSBR BREWING CO.; 14th 

and Walnut: City 1913. 
MENK'S BREWERY; 913 S. 18th St.; City 

1912; South 2190. 
PABST BREWING CO.; 1332 W. Jefferson; 

Both Phones 1389. 

BRICK AND BUILDING MATERIALS 
SOUTHERN BRICK & TILE CO.; T. Bishop, 
Agent; cor. 13th and Ormsby St.; Manu- 
facturers of Building Brick, Face Brick, 
Farm Drain Tile and Contractors for Put- 
ing in Drain Tile; South 1622-Y; City 
547. 

BROOM MANUFACTURERS 

MARTIN, W. L., BROOM & MOP CO; 1010- 
1026 S. Preston St.; Oity 728; Manufac- 
turers of Fine Brooms and Mops. 

BUTTER 

DIXIE BUTTER CO.; 502 Fehr Ave.; City 
2934; Main 1982-Y. 



CASKET MANUFACTURERS 
NATIONAL CASKET CO.; 11th and Maga- 
zine; Both Phones 1386. 

CANDY MANUFACTURERS AND 
DEALERS 
BRAD AS & GHEENS; 817 S. Floyd; City 
268; South 268. 

CEMENT 

KOSMOiS PORTLAND CEMENT CO., In- 
corporated; Paul Jones Bldg. ; City 6; 
Main 77. 

CHILE PARLORS 

BUNGER, H. J.; Chile Parlor; 419 S. 8th 

St.; City 3998. 
ROGERS, T. D.; 1020 W. Walnut St.; City 

5026. 



69 



CHINA, GLASS 
DO'LPINGER, J., & CO.; 642 S. 4th St.; 
City 326; Main 326. 

CIGARS 
MOOS, THE J. B., CO; 518 W. Main; Sam 

Fisher, Mgr.; City 1038; Main 1038. 
TARPY, T. W., & CO.; 601 and 603 W. 

Market St.; City 6180. 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

AMERICAN DYE WORKS; 312 E. Walnut 
■St.; City 1634-1635; Main 1634-1635. 

ART DYERS & CLEANERS; 326 E. Gray 
St.; City 4660. 

CLOAK MANUFACTURERS 
LOUISVILLE CLOAK & SUIT CO.; 639 W. 
Main St.; City 2239. 

CLOTHING 

KLOTHEIS SHOPPE, Incorporated; 206 S. 

4th St.; City 9390; Main 1857. 
STRIEGEL, M. J., & CO., Incorporated; 419 

W. Jefferson St.; City 2582; Main 2582; 

Men's and Young Men's Fine Clothing, 

Furnishings and Caps. 

COAL— WHOLESALE 
DUGAN COAL CO.; 2nd and River; Main 

694-A. 
ELBERT COAL & T. CO.; 1400 S. 7th St.; 

City 2928; South 2460. 
WALLINS CREEK SALES CO. ; Paul Jones 

Bldg.; City 422; Main 1954-9931. 

COAL AND COKE 
CANE RUN COAL CO.; 1420 Olive St.; 

Shawnee 30. 
FRUEOHTENIOHT, E.; Preston St. Road; 

City 1104. 



COFFEE ROASTERS 

NORTON & CURD CO., THE, Incorporated; 
515 W. Main St.; City 1646. 

SCHAELDER, STEPHEN J.; 118 W. Breck- 
inridge; City 2699; Dealer in Coffee, Pea- 
nuts and Cheese. 

CONFECTIONERS 
WOLF, MISS JOSEPHINE; 963 S. 3rd St.; 

City 981; South 981. 
WOLF, T.; 1607 Second St.; City 5547. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

HOUSE OF KINGS, Incorporated; 118 N. 
4th St.; Main and City 2892; Upholstering, 
Mirrors, Furniture Repairing. 

KOERNER, C. A., & CO.; 318 E. Burnett; 
City 1345. 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY BRIDGE & IRON 
Co., Incorporated, and FRUIN COLNON 
CONTRACTING CO., Incorporated ; Gen- 
eral Contractors; River Road. 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

DOTSON BROS.; 1436 S. ISth St.; Shawnee 
2255; Pastuerized Dairy Products, Ice 
Cream and Sherbet. 

FINEBERG, A., CREAMERY; 405 S. Pres- 
ton St.; City 8591; Manufacturers and 
Dealers. 

HIIBSCH, CHAS. J.; 2710 Bank St.; Shaw- 
nee 555. 

SCHNEIDER, WM.; 37th and Doerhoefer; 
Shawnee 1449. 

YANN, T. E., DAIRY CO., Incorporated; 508 
Wenzel St.; City 4262. 

DEAD ANIMAL CONTRACTORS 
PERO & STOBCKER; Tallow Renderers; 
River Road near Limits; City 1648. 



DENTISTS 

ALVIS, DR. S. W.; Armstrong Bldg.; City 
8951. 

McILWAIN, C. E.; D. M. D., M. D.; 405 Ma- 
sonic Bldg.; City 629. 

DRUGS, MEDICINES AND SUNDRIES 

G. C. REIS; Preston and Ormsby; South 49- 
9249; City 49. 

SCIHMTTT, P. P.; 22nd and Magazine; West 
9232. 

SHAWNEE PHARMACY; 34th and Broad- 
way; West 9320. 

DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS 
DeCOURSEY, MRS. MARGARET; 4478 Park 

Blvd.: South 9173-A. 
LADD, W. P.; Dry Goods, etc.; 2221 Wilson; 

Shawnee 178. 

DRAMATIC ART 

LEWIS, MISS BETTIE; 725 S. 4th St.; 
South 1221-Y; Teacher of Expression and 
Dramatic Art. Prepare Pupils for Lyceum 
Work. 

ELEVATOR (GRAIN) 

KENTUCKY PUBLIC ELEVATOR CO.; 14th 
and St. Catherine; City 69. 

THOMSON, W. A., MILL & ELEVATOR 
CO., Incorporated; Floyd and Eastern 
Parkway; Oity 503; South 552. 

ELEVATOR MANUFACTURERS 
ABELL ELEVATOR CO.; 8th St. below 

Main; City 2385; Main 2385; Builders of 

Passenger and Freight Elevators. 
AMERICAN ELEVATOR & MACHINE CO., 

500 E. Main St.; City 1115; Main 1115; 

Made in Louisville. 



70 



ELECTRICAL MACHINE REPAIRS 
SOUTHERN ELEVATOR. CO.; 120 S. 8th 
St.; City 2501. 

FLORISTS 

BEUTEL & FREDERICK; Florists; 1229- 

1231 S. Brook St.; City 322; South 222-A. 
FUCHS, H.; 670 S. 4th St.; Main 567; City 

5687. 
MARKET & MILLER; 814 Cherokee Road; 

Highland 98G; East 986- A. 
REIMERS, MRS. M. D.; 63G S. 4th St.; 

Main 39; City 39; Choice Cut Flowers and 

Design Work Delivered on Short Notice. 
SCHULZ, JACOB, CO., Incorporated; 550 

S. 4th St.; Both Phones 223; Camp Taylor 

Branch; South 9278. 
THOMPSON, C. B., & CO.; 532 S. 4th St.; 

Main 1050; City 1050. 
WALKER, F., & CO.; 312 W. Chestnut St.; 

Main 1388-A; City 1388. 
WALKER, WM, CO.; 615 S. 4th St.; Both 

Phones 558. 

FRUITS 

PERRONIE, JOE, & CO.; 315 E. Jefferson 
St.; City 7840; Wholesale and Retail. 

DATTILO, GUS, FRUIT CO.; 307 E. Jeffer- 
son St.; City 2113; Main 1109-A; Whole- 
sale and Retail. 

FURS 

BLAKE, THE FURRIER; 509 S. 5th St.; 
City 3224. 

FURNACES 

BRAND & BOHRIMAN; 225 S. 7th St.; City 
3135; Main 3135-A; Warm Air Furnaces. 

STRATTON & TERSTEGGE CO.; 15th and 
Main Sts.; West 94; Warm Air, Steam and 
Hot Water Heating. 



GARAGES 

WIELAND & FORD GARAGE; 221 and 223 

S. 9th St.; City 6299. 

GENT'S FURNISHING, DRY GOODS AND 

NOTIONS 
FLEiIG, PHIL J.; 730 S. Shelby; City 7999. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND SHOES 

LOEMKER, F. C; 2932 S. 4th St.; South 
9150; Parkway 390. 

GEOLOGISTS 

PEMBERTON, J. R.; 802 Starks Bldg.; City 
4198. 

GLASS AND GLAZING 
BLITZ, WOLF; 335 E. Walnut; City 8550; 
Main 2072. 

GRAIN, RECEIVERS AND SHIPPERS 
CLIFT, J. L.; Room 25, Board of Trade 
Bldg.; City 830; Main 830. 

GROCERS— RETAIL 

ALLGFJIER, CHAS; 945 Mary; City 4057. 

ANDERSON, W. A.; 1400 W. Chestnut; City 
7406. 

ARNOLD, W. H.; 18th and Boiling, Shaw- 
nee 121. 

BARNES, LEE M.; 19th and Magazine; 
Shawnee 1339. 

BAUER, GEO. E.; 2135 S. Floyd; City 6710. 

BENSON, W. A., & CO.; 802 S. 34th St.; 
Shawnee 1427; West 211-A. 

BICKEL, J. H., & SON; 22nd and Cedar; 
Shawnee 376. 

BLEEMEL, MRS. M.; 830 E. Chestnut; City 
3053; Main 9154-Y. 



BRECKINRIDGE CASH GROCERY CO ■ 868 
S. 5th St.; City 2148; South 786. 

CROWE, R. E.; Berry Blvd. and Leutz- 
Parkway 332. 

CUCU, DAN; 401 East F St.; City 4358. 

DAHLEM, JOS.; N. E. cor. 24th and Main 
Sts.; Shawnee 2067. 

DANNER, WM.; 3216 Kirby; Shawnee 689. 

DILLMAN GROCERY; Adams and Washing- 
ton; City 7893. 

FJBERLE, MRS. F.; 2001 Rowan St.; West 
9264. 

FENZ, B.; 441 E. St. Catherine; City 4131 

South 9109. 
FLYN, MISS NOLAN F.; 632 S. 18th St. 

West 9188. 
FUSTING'S GROCERY; 4544 W. Market 

Shawnee 2109. 
GAWRONSKY, H.; 619 S. 7th St.; City 5825 

Main 2575-Y. 
GERBER, J.; 3rd and South Park R>ad 

South 9193; Parkway 230-J. 
GOCKE, W. L.; S. W. cor. Clay and Breck- 
inridge; Oity 5682. 
GRIESHABER, ALFRED; Shelby ville Road 

and St. Matthews; Crescent 133. 
HAAS, JACOB; N. E. cor. 2nd and Green; 

City 1013; Main 9266. 
HALLER, JACOB; 1000 E. Breckinridge; 

Bast 9127; Highland G66. 

HAZEL, F. O; 530 E. F St.; City 9019. 

HECK, FRED; 1101 Goss; City 5321. 

HEGER, FRANK; 901 E. Market; City 1243. 

HEINS, JOHN; 828 E. Market; City 4216; 
Main 1545-Y. 

HELLMAN, JAKE; 1000 Ellison; City 6212. 

HUDSON & KNOPF; Franck and Frankfort 
Ave.; East 1087-1088; Crescent 27. 



7i 



KELMAN, L. H.; 1901 W. Market St.; West 
9344. 

KBRNAN, PRANK; Preston St. Road and 
Shelby; South 9132; City 4279. 

KTPPES, MRS. A.; S. W. cor. 16th and 
Prentice; City 536. 

KLARER, LEO; 758 S. 18th St.; Shawnee 
425. 

KOHJjMIEIER, PETER; I860 Van Buren ; 

Oity 8759. 
KRAMER, C. A.; Cane Run Road; West 

9169. 
KURZ, H.; Taylorsville Road; East 38G 

Highland 129. 
LE1S, OHAS.; S. E. cor. 31st and Southern 

Shawnee 72. 
LEVY, A.; 748 S. 23rd St.; West 232-A 

Shawnee 451. 
MAYER, LOUIS; 1451 S. 1st, cor. Burnett 

City 937; South G2-943-Y. 

MEINERT, JOE; 701 E. St. Catherine; City 

6335. 
McHUGH, PATRICK; N. W. cor. 11th and 

Maple Etta.; City 4885. 
NICKOLS, S. E.; 2723 S. 7th St.; Parkway 

237. 
OLDIGES, J. W.; S. W. cor. 24th and 

Rowan; Shawnee 816. 
PEZOLD, JOHN; 1051 Fehr; City 5053. 
RAPP, WM.; 413 S. 15th St.; City 1512. 
SCHNEIDER, PHIL; 1435 W. Walnut; City 

4018. 
SCHUB, H.; 1463 S. 7th St.; South 1558-Y. 
SCHRODT, JOHN T.; S. E. cor. 15th and 

Market; City 2536. 

SCHULER, H.; 1533 Maple St.; West 9217; 
City 7143. 

SCHUMAN, JOSEPH; 945 S. Preston; South 
1491-A. 



SCHUCHARD, J. C: Groceries, Fresh Meats 
and Vegetables; 21st and Walnut; Shaw- 
nee 1304. 

SCHULMAN, SAM; Groceries and Fresh 
Meats; 16th and St. Catherine; City 2651. 

SCHUM, AUGUST; 20th and Griffith Ave.; 
Shawnee 945. 

SHER, DAVID; 1424 W. Walnut; City 5007. 

SH1RA, B. B.; 2300 Howard SI.; Shawnee 
369. 

STE1DEX, ALONZO; 3101 Portland; West 
9321. 

STONE, FRED G.; Jackson and Lilly; City 

554. 
STRAUB, ALFRED P.; 935 S. Clay; City 

7275. 
STRAUSS, ANTON; Groceries and Meats; 

1604 Story Ave.; City 3592. 
TAFFE, C. E.; 902 Burton; South 9201. 
TELLMAN, T., & SON; 1233 W. Broadway; 

City 9169. 
TURK, D. ; Groceries, Fresh Meats and Vege- 
tables; 2239 Magazine: Shawnee 85. 
ULLRICH BROS.; 850 E. Walnut St.; City 

4418; Main 9351-A. 
WEBER, A. C; 1335 E. Washington; City 

5421. 
YUTZ & CO.; 200 E. Lee; City 7942; South 

9270. 

GROCERS— WHOLESALE 

BOLLINGER-BABBAGE CO.; 714 W. Main; 
City G10; Main 610-A. 

KENTUCKY GROCERY CO.; 123 E. Wash- 
ington St.; Main 2096-A; City 2096. 

MERCHANTS WHOLESALE GROCERY 
CO.; 205 W. Main; City 2653; Main 1705. 

NATIONAL GROCERY CO., 723 W. Main; 
City 1885; Main 266. 



WEDEKIND, H., & C; 03.7 W. Market St.; 
City 480; Main 180. 



HAIR STORE, DRESSERS, ETC. 
MISS ALICE; Hair Store; 419 W. Walnut 
St.; Main 1419-A; Manicuring, Shampoo- 
ing, Hair Goods. 

HARDWARE, TOOLS, CUTLERY, ETC. 
HEICK, HENRY, HARDWARE CO.; 322 W. 
Market St.; Main 432; Oity 432. 



HARDWOOD FLOORS, ETC. 

LOUISVILLE OAK FLOORING CO.; 23rd 
and Magnolia; Shawnee 84; West 474-A. 

HAY, GRAIN, MILL FEED, ETC. 
DUCKWALL, E. G., & CO.; 828 S. 20th St.; 

Shawnee 673; Main 073. 
EDINGER & CO., Incorporated; 14th and 

Magazine; Both Phones. 

HAY, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

FRUECHTENICHT, H.; Hancock and Frank- 
lin Sts.; Main 1878. 

MILLER, W. P.; 3rd and L Sts.; South 
412-Y. 

HAY, GRAIN AND FEED 

PARKLAND FEED CO.; Hemlock and R. R.; 
Shawnee 55; Wholesale and Retail. 

HIDES, WOOL, ETC. 
MARX, NATHAN, & SON CO.; 130 E. Main 
St.; Main 1940. 

HOSPITALS AND SANATORIUMS 

JEWISH HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION OF 
LOUISVILLE; Non-Sectarian; 236 E. Ken- 
tucky St.; South 1036; City 2721-7489. 

LOUISVILLE NEUROPATHIC SANATORI- 
UM; 1412 S. 6th St.; South 480; City 5996. 



72 



HOTELS 
HERMITAGE, THE; 543 S. 5th St.; Main 

1685; City 9200. 
WATKINS HOTEL; 422 W. Chestnut St.; 

Main 9141; City 2291. 

INSURANCE— LIFE 

JARVIS, J. K.; 518 Starts BIdg.; Main 2262; 

City 2262. 
JOHNSON, CLANCY T.; 410 Starks BIdg.; 

Main 1593-A; City 6643; Life Insurance. 
PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE CO.; Ordinary 

Department; Howard G. Lea, Manager; 

Starks Building; Main 74. 

- INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

DUBISKE, H. W., & CO.; Inter-Southern 
BIdg.; Main 1311-Y. 

IRON WORKS 

BALKE & CO.; 104 S. Clay; Main 2920; 
City 2920. 

JEWELERS 

RADIUS JEWELRY CO.; 408 S. 4th St.; 
City 1925. 

JUNK DEALERS 

FREDERICKS, PAUL; 214 S. Floyd St.; 
City 6085. 

LADIES' TAILORING 

ISILER & SCHULMAN; 306 Boston BIdg.; 
City 1767; Main 2283. 

LOAN COMPANIES 

MICHIGAN LOAN CO.; 311 S. 4th St.; City 
7348. 

LUMBER, PLANING MILLS, ETC. 
COOK, FRANK S., & CO.; 1518 W. Main 
St,; West 725-A. . 



LUMBER YARDS AND DEALERS 
EIM1BRY LUMBER CO.; S. W. cor. 16th and 
Breckinridge; City 12. 

KENTUCKY LUMBER & MILL-WORK CO.; 

Honesty of Service; N. E. cor. 6th and A 

Sts.; We make everything in Wood for 

your Building; City 1272. 
MENGEIL, C. C, & BRO. CO.; 4th and G; 

City 1130; South 77. 



MACHINE SHOP 

KEIL BALL JOINT CO.; 1214 S. 
City 7491. 



Jackson; 



MAGISTRATES 
ERVINE, S. A.; (Squire); 410 Central; 
Parkway 79. 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

BROWN, R. BROOKS; Starks BIdg.; Main 
2758. 

MEAT MARKET AND BUTCHERS 
FLOYD STREET MARKET; N. E. cor. 

Floyd and Gray; Groceries, Fresh Meat 

and Vegetables; A. H. Leonhardt; City 

1609. 
NOLLS MEAT MARKET; 129 W. Jefferson; 

Main 1252; City 6167. 
WATSON & HALL; Grocery and Meat 

Market; 619 W. Broadway; City 4705. 

MERCANTILE AGENCIES. 
BRADSTREET, THE, CO.; James E. Pear- 
son, Jr., Manager; Todd BIdg.; Main 72. 

MILK AND ICE CREAM 
NATIONAL ICE CREAM CO.; Perfectly Pas- 
teurized Dairy Products; 128 E. Broad- 
way; City 624-634-644; Main 624. . 



MINERAL WATERS 
EPPING, JOHN G., BOTTLING WORKS; 
716 Logan. 

RIVO PRODUCT CO.; 428 S. 7th St.; City 

1281. 

SPRING BANK BOTTLING CO.; 540 E. 
Gray; City 3225; Dealer in all Soft Drinks, 
Spring Bank Cherry Phosphate Specialty. 

MIRRORS 

FALLS OITY MIRROR WORKS; Manufac- 
turers of French Mirrors; 134 N. 4th St.; 
City 5708; Beveling and Silvering of all 
kinds of glass. 

MODISTES 
ROBARDS, MISS B.; Dressmaking Shop; 

526 S. 4th St.; Main 1504. 
SANDERS, MRS. E.; Apt. 210 Guthrie-Coke 

BIdg; Main 709-A. 

MOVERS AND PACKERS 

SMITH, C. G. & A. M.; Furniture, Piano 
Packing & Storage Co.; Local and Long 
Distance Moving; 420 S. 5th St.; City 
1361; Main 1361. 

MONUMENTS AND MAUSOLEUMS STONE 
NEW MULDOON MONUMENT CO.; 625 S. 
3rd St.; City 1986; Main 574. 

OILS 

AETNA REFINING CO.: Inter-Southern 

BIdg.; Main 772; City 772. 
GULF REFINING CO.; 3rd and Kentucky; 

City 1485. 
GULF REFINING CO.; 7th and R. R.; City 

1448. 
McCOiMiBiS OIL CO.; Abram Renick, Pres.; 

Inter-Southern BIdg.; Main 1369. 



73 



OIL SECURITIES 
HIGH GRAVITY OIL SALES CO.; Todd 
Bldg.; Main 2021; City 1481. 

OFFICE BUILDINGS 
TYLER BUILDING; 319 W. Jefferson St.; 
Main 2229. 

OFFICE FIXTURES 
LOUISVTLLB FIXTURE & FURNITURE 
CO.; 823-829 Fehr Ave.; City 1809. 

OLD IRON AND METAL DEALERS 
S1ILVERSTEIN, D. H., & CO.; 29th and 
Cleveland; Shawnee 1175; West 1175. 

OPTICIANS 
SOUTHERN OPTICAL CO.; 4th and Chest- 
nut Sts.; Main 2800; City 2800. 

OYSTERS, FISH AND GAME 
SEGAL & BOYER FISH CO.; 311 E. Jeffer- 
son; City 1061; Wholesale and Retail. 
SOWDERS MARKET; H. J. Lovell, Prop.; 
115 W. Jefferson; City 4950-4951; Main 
2317-Y. 
SPRINGMANN FISH CO.; Brook and Market 
Sts.; Both Phones 2646. 

PAINTS, OIL AND GLASS 
PEASLEE-GAULBERT CO.; 407 W. Main 
St.; Main 1916; City 8150. 

PARLORS 

PYTHIAN MUTUAL PARLOR; 603 S. 10th 
St.; City 6744; Delicious Soda, Pure Cream. 
Sanitary Service. 

PARKS 
BRUEN'S PARK & RESTAURANT; 45th 
and Market Sts.; Shawnee 809. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

ROYAL PHOTO CO.; 421 and 313 South 4th 
St.; Main 4378; City 4378; We have photo- 
graphed 30,000 individual Soldiers at Camp 
Taylor. Duplicates can be had at any- 
time. 

MECCA STUDIO OF LOUISVILLE, INDI- 
ANAPOLIS AND DAYTON; Makers of 
Fine Portraits; 326 W. Jefferson St.; City 
4839. 

PLASTER 

ATLAS WALL PLASTER CO.; 30th and 

Greenwood. 
BANNON, WM. P.; Brook and Bloom; City 

8380. 
STEPHEN, JOHN, CO.; 1633 Rosewood; 

Highland 4. 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 
HESTER, DR. J. H.; St arks Bldg.; Eye, 
Bar, Nose and Throat; City 826; Main 
84-Y. 

PLUMBERS 
ALTHAUS, CARL, CO.; 400 Realty Bldg.; 

City 8381; Main 1956. 
BALLMAIER, CHAS.; 239 E. Market. 
DEGEN, H. C; 404 S. 26th St.; Shawnee 

1200. 
GRAY & TOMPPERT; 414 S. 1st St.; City 

3783; Main 3783. 
HAFENDORFER, ROBERT J.; 709 S. 18th 

St.; City 2781. 
KOELLNER, L.; 628 S. 2nd St.; City 2344; 

Main 2344. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, ETC. 

KUHN, C; 1437% S. 2nd St.; South 1904-Y. 
MEYER, WM. F.; 710 E. Market St.; City 
4758. 



PRINTERS 

BRADLEY & GILBERT CO.; 648 S. 7th St.; 

Both Phones 205. 
MORTON, JOHN P., & CO., Incorporated; 

422-26 W. Main St.; Main 532; City 532; 

Printing Business and Social Stationery, 

Office Furniture, Typewriters, etc. 

PRINTERS' ROLLER MANUFACTURER 
VOGT MANUFACTURING CO.; 1023 W. 
Market St.; Main 2218; City 1215. 

PRESERVE MANUFACTURERS 
BIECHNER PRESERVING CO.; 41st and 
Market Sts.; Shawnee 170. 

PRODUCE AND COMMISSION 
BUECHEL PRODUCE EXCHANGE; Whole- 
sale and Retail; Buechel, Ky.; Highland 
306-J. 

GARGOTTO, CASPER & CO.; Wholesale and 
Retail; 303 E. Jefferson; City 3207. 

PIOWATY, M. & SONS; Wholesale and Re- 
tail; 309 S. Brook St.; City 8232; Main 
1959. 

PROVISION DEALERS 
INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIR CO.; 215 E. 
Jefferson St.; City 1898. 

VISSIMAN, C. F., & CO., Incorporated; 117 
Bickel; City 774. 

POULTRY DEALERS 
MALONEY GARRETT & CO.; Live and 
Dressed Poultry; 128 E. Jefferson St.; City 
765; Main 1244-Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

AUDUBON PARK REALTY CO.; Starks 
Bldg.; Four hundred acres donated free by 
our Company formed the nucleus for the 
Camp Zaohary Taylor site; Main 437. 



74 



CLARKE, D. C; Starks Bldg.; City 1771 

.Main 485-A. 
JONE1S, J. A., & CO.; 32 Kenyon Bldg. 

Main 1398-A; City 2872. 
MILLER, ED., & SONS; Oklolona, Ky. 

City 2276-L. 
PETER, C. ROBERT, & CO.; Paul Jones 

Bldg.; City Property, Farms, Rents, Sales, 

Leases; Main 1473; City 8129. 
RECK, FRANK J.; 512 W. Jefferson; City 

1747. 
SENG, H. H.; 429 V 2 W. Jefferson; City 5545. 
S PROWL, E. R.; 147 S. 5th St; City 583; 

Real Estate and Auctioneer, Headquarters 

for Farms. 
STREIOHER, M. J.; 205 Republic Bldg.; 

City 7902; Main 1360; Real Estate in all 

its Branches. 

RESTAURANTS 

BUSY BEE LUNCH ROOM; 406 S. 3rd St.; 

City 9352. 
CENTER RESTAURANT; 412 S. 5th St.; A. 

C. Hoefflin, Prop.; City 920. 
EMPIRE RESTAURANT; 232 S. 3rd St.; 

Leo. G. Arthur, Prop.; City 3042; Open 

Day and Night. 
GEM RESTAURANT; S. E. cor. 14th and 

Main; City 1025. 
LA PALMA CAFETERIA CO.; 421 S. 4th 

St.; Main 990. 
LOUISVILLE DAIRY LUNCH & RESTAU- 
RANT; 931 W. Broadway; City 8773; 

Open Day and Night. 
THE FRANK GENTILE RESTAURANT; 

1009 W. Broadway; City 4762. 
UNION RESTAURANT; 318 S. 3rd; City 

1859. 
VIRES, STEVE P.; 203 E. Jefferson; City 

3640. 



ROOFING AND SHEET METAL 

HOLSTNER, J. M.; 2621 W. Main; Shawnee 
1231; Specialty of Fire Doors. 

SOHUPP, FERD F.; 938 Logan; City 7453. 

ROOFING AND SUPPLIES 

BOHN, MRS. GEO. P.; 211 E. Green St.; 
City 3269. 

HARPRING, L. H.; 1236 S. Shelby St.; 
Hardware and Cutlery; South 1704-Y; 
City 5480. 

KLEIER, HENRY, JR.; 543 S. Shelby St.; 
City 3368; Cooking and Heating Stoves. 

ZELLEIR, HERMAN; 811 S. Clay; City 1044; 
Tin Roofing and Sheet Metal Contracting. 

RUBBER MANUFACTURER'S 

GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER CO.; 331 E. 

Broadway; Main 942; City 902. 

RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS 

KOEHLER STAMP & STENCIL CO.; 406 
W. Main; City 2764; Main 2764-A. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS AND AUTO 
SUPPLIES 

HARBISON & GATHRIGHT; 709-711 W. 
Main St.; City 414. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS 

JACQUO, C. H.; 3106 S. 4th St.; South 971-A. 

LIPS, G. R.; 1377 S. Preston St.; City 3650; 
Manufacturers and Dealers, Repairing 
Neatly Done. 

MILLER, JOHN, SADDLERY CO.; 820 W. 
Main St.; City 3656; Manufacturers and 
Dealers. 



SALOONS 

AUTZ, LOUIS; 628 W. Magnolia; City 1893. 

BECKER, JAKE; N. E. cor. 18th and Galla- 
gher; City 7225. 

BOYLE, HARRY M.; 2749 Bank St.; Shaw- 
nee 1120. 

BROWN, A.; 918 W. Walnut; Main 9414; 
City 1368. 

BYRON, A. J.; 108 S. Johnson St.; City 403. 

CONLBY, WM.; 748 S. Shelby St.; City 
1829; South 9185-A. 

CRESCENT BUFFETT; 408 W. Walnut St.; 
City 9328; Main 9137. 

DIENBS, JACOB; N. E. cor. 26th and Gar- 
land Ave.; Shawnee 422; West 9289. 

EISENBBIS, PHIL.; 622 Baxter Ave.; High- 
land 705. 

ENTERPRISE CAFE; 4433 Louisville Ave.; 
Parkway 214. 

GOEPPER, THEO.; Poplar Level Road; 
City 6392. 

GOSS, MASON; N. W. cor. Shelby and 
Broadway; City 2528. 

GRIESHABER, F. A.; N. E. cor. 4th and L 
Sts.; Parkway 24. 

GROTTEiNHOFF, GEO.; 349 E. Green St.; 
City 5046. 

H ALBLIEB, PHIL. ; S. E. cor. 18th and Main 
Sts.; City 3609. 

HERLEY, POPE; 1001 W. Walnut St.; City 
2742. 

HUNT, F. J.; Logan and St. Catherine; City 
7005. 

JACOBS, F. W.; 331 N. 19th St.; West 9100. 

JUTT, EDW. J.; 401 S. Preston St.; City 
8224. 

KELLY, JAMES P.; 3001 Alford; West 9117. 

KROEGER, JOHN H.; 112 W. Market St.; 
City 2030. 



75 



LAND, GEO., CAFE; 1801 W. Walnut St.; 

Shawnee 411. 
LUTZ, ED.; 937 S. Shelby; City 7849. 
MARTIN, OCHSNER; Shelbyville Road; 

Crescent 63. 
NIEHANS, AUG.; 542 E. Madison St.; City 

5004. 
OEFFTNGER, MATHEW; 1529 Rardstown 

Road; Highland 170. 

OLLEGES, HENRY C; 500 E. Madison St.; 
City 9249. 

PYTHIAN RATHSKELLER; 10th and 
Chestnut Sts.; Matinee Cabaret every 
Thursday 3 to 6 P. M.; Bristow Morris, 
Mgr.; City 2969. 

RATH, AUG. F.; 421 E. Jefferson St.; City 
2845. 

RHEA & PRATT; 2532 S. 4th St.; Parkway 
423. 

RUSTERHOLZ, EUGENE; 6th and Market 
Sts.; City 6064; Main 9260. 

SCHMITT BROS. CAFE; S. W. cor. Wenzel 
and Market Sts.; City 2854; Main 9160-Y; 
Fine Wines and Liquors, Cigars and To- 
bacco. 

SGHNEITER, J. L., JR.; 636 W. Shipp; City 
4256. 

SCHUBLE, ROMAN, CO.; N. W. cor. Jack- 
son and Finzer; City 5631. 

SCHWENKER, FRANK; 944 E. Walnut St.; 
City 4664. 

SEIBERT, WM. K.; 2533 W. Walnut St.; 
Shawnee 1058. 

SEIBERT, L.; 829 S. 18th St.; West 9327. 

SENATORS CAFE; 210 S. 5th; City 2294. 

SMITH, WM.; 125 N. 4th St.: City 3902. 

STRAUSS & SCHNEIDER; S. W. cor. 6th 
and Market Sts.; City 54G0. 



TELLMAN, JOHN C; 801 W. Broadway; 

City 2012; Main 9289. 
WEIR, J. C; 412 S. Jackson; Main 1982- A. 
WILLIAN, SHERMAN; 4447 Louisville Ave.; 

Parkway 67. 
WILLIAMS, A.; 10th and Walnut Sts.; City 

1-742. 
WILSON'S CAFE; 219 S. 3rd; City 6788. 



SAND AND GRAVEL 

NUGENT SAND CO.; Clay and Fulton Sts.; 
City 1475. 

SCRAP IRON 

KLEMPNER BROS.: Scrap Iron and Metals; 

13th and Rowan Sts.; Both Phones 1280. 
LOUISVILLE SCRAP MATERIAL CO.: 

Preston and Washington; City 3389. 
SOUTHERN METAL CO.: Iron and Steel 

Scrap, Rubber and Metals; 1316-1332 W. 

Walnut St.: City 1629; Main 1629. 

SCREENS AND WEATHER STRIPS 

BOHN, H. A., SCREEN WORKS; Baxter 
and Breckinridge; Highland 754. 

SECOND HAND DEALERS 
WASSERMAN, L.; First Class Shoe Shop; 

622 W. Oak St.; City 5511. 
YOFFE, PHILIP; 439 S. Preston St.; City 

4561. 

SEED DEALERS 

HARDIN, HAMILTON & LEWMAN; 1127 W. 
Main St.; City 8; Wholesale Seed Dealers 
and Onion Sets. 

SEWING MACHINES 
WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO.; 655 S. 4th 
St.; City 6283; Main 1288-A. 



SHEET IRON WORKS 
KALKHOFF & VISSING: R. F. D. Buechel, 
Ky.; City 1395; Resident Phone Highland 
1445-.I. 

SHEET METAL WORKS 

RIDDELL MANUFACTURING CO.; 21st and 
Rowan Sts.; Shawnee 17. 

SOCIETY STATIONERS AND ENGRAVERS 

KENTUCKY ENGRAVING CO.; 652 S. 4th 
St.; Main 88. 

STOCK MERCHANDISE 

MARKS, HARRY: 121 S. 7th St.; City 8127; 
City 1(157; Wanted to Buy Stock of Mer- 
chandise. 

STOCK YARDS 

BOURBON STOCK YARDS CO.; Office, 
Johnson and Main Sts.; City 2571. 

STOVES AND HARDWARE RETAIL 
BIRKEL, L., & SONS; S. E. cor. 24th and 
Cedar Sts.; Shawnee 1406. 

SURETY COMPANIES 

McHENRY, JOHN J.; Insurance and Bonds; 
612 Columbia Bldg.; City 1701; Main 1701. 

SYRUPS 

OTTER, J. D, & CO.; 10th and St. Louis 

Ave. 
OTTER & CO.; Branch; 217 E. Jefferson St.; 

South 939. 



TABLE SLIDES 

.I10KKERSON WOODWORK CO.; 14th and 
Hill Sts.; South 200. 



76 



TAILORS 

CLASSY TAILOR; 427 W. Chestnut St.; 
City 71 S3. 

LONG & EVANS; Merchant Tailors; Speed 
Bldg.; Main 4G0; 4th and Guthrie Sts.; 
Military Outfitters. 

RICHTER, EDW. H.; 546% S. 4th, Majestic 
Rldg.; Home Phone City G894; Fine Mili- 
tary Tailor, Clothes made to fit. Fine Im- 
ported Woolens. 

3EILIGMAN, S.; 642 S. 1st St.; Tailor Dry 
Cleaning and Pressing, Highest prices paid 
for used clothing. Goods called for and 
delivered. New and used clothes bought 
and sold; City 4579. 

TALKING MACHINES 
LA HARMONIE COMPAGNIE; 5(12 S. 4th 
St.; Victrolas and Victor Records, Hawai- 
ian Guitars and Ukuleles. 

TANNERS AND CURRIERS 
RITTER, RICHARD; S. E. cor. 34th and 

Herman: Shawnee 1162. 
SCHUFF, WM., & CO., Incorporated; 803 S. 

12bh St.; City 1359; Main 1359; Cutters 

of Boss Oak Sole Leather. 

TAXICABS 
REKER, WM. J.; 1060 S. 7th St.; City 1544 ; 
South 9158. 

TEAS AND COFFEES 
BRAUN, J. G., & CO.: 129 E. Jefferson St.; 
City 2155. 

THEATRES 

B. F. KEITH'S MARY ANDERSON THEA- 
TRE; City 8294; Main 930; Big Time 
Vaudeville; Two Shows Daily 2:15—8:15. 

B. F. KEITH STRAND THEATRE; 4th and 
Chestnut Sts.; Main 75-Y; City 5051; Home 
of Art Craft Pictures. 



LOUISVILLE GAYETY THEATRE CO., In- 
corporated; W. W. Woolfolk, Mgr.; 313 
W. .Jefferson St.; Cumli. Main 2380. 



TIME RECORDER MANUFACTURERS 
INTERNATIONAL TIME RECORDING CO.; 
Lincoln Bldg.; A. V. Crawford, Sales 
Agent; Main 2371. 

TIRE MANUFACTURERS 
TEN BROECK TYRE CO.; 804 S. 26th St.; 
S'hawnee 844. 

TOBACCO 
NATIONAL TOBACCO WORKS; 17th and 

Broadway; City 338-411; Main 338. 
TOBACCO REHANDLING 00., Limited; 

1018 W. Main St.; City 282; 21st and 

Tyler; Shawnee 360. 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSES 

UUCKNER, J. M.; 1001 Hamilton Ave.; 
South 1499. 

TOWEL SUPPLY 

SPALDING LAUNDRY & SUPPLY CO.; 
13th and Breckinridge Sts.; City 18SG- 
1887; Main 1887 

TRADING STAMPS 
CO-OPERATIVE TRADING STAMP CO.; 
Commercial Bldg.; Main 1404; City 1184. 

TRANSFER COMPANIES 
HIGHLAND TRANSFER CO.; Eastern Park- 
way; Highland 40G. 

IRING TRANSFER CO.; 1213 W. Main St.; 

City 2514. 

LOUISVILLE TRANSFER CO.; A. H. 
Hughes, Mgr.; 9th and Green; City 329-28; 
Touring Cars and Taxicabs, Baggage. 



TYPEWRITERS AND SUPPLIES 
TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE; 420 S. 2nd St.; 
All makes sold, rented and repaired. Rent- 
als three months, Ave dollars; City 3105. 

UNDERTAKERS 

FOX, EDW. J., Incorporated; 1827 W. Broad- 
way; Shawnee 340. 

McDANIEL BROS.; 4444 Park Blvd.; Un- 
dertakers and Embalmers; City 287. 

SMITH, MRS. R. R.; 841 S. 7th St.; City 
3400. 

UPHOLSTERERS AND CABINETMAKERS 
BECKER, EMIL; Office and Shop; 616 S. 1st 
St.; Dealer in Antique Furniture, Uphol- 
stering, Repairing and Finishing done in 
first class manner; City 7129. 

UTILITIES 
KENTUCKY UTILITIES CO.; Paul Jones 
Bldg.; Main 1590; City 958. 

VENEER MILLS 
SOUTHERN VENEER MANUFACTURING 
CO.; Manufacturing of Lumber and Ve- 
neer; 21st and Standard; Shawnee 8. 



WAREHOUSE 
PICKRELL & CRAIG CO.; 209 E. Main St.; 
City 7959-7958. 

VETERINARY SURGEONS 
LANG, DR. E. M.; 513 E. Market St.; Main 

9460; City 463. 
RIESTER, F. H.; 308 S. 6th St.; City 8793. 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS 
FLEISCHMANN YEAST CO., THE; 418 S. 
2nd St.; City 86; Main 1511-Y; W. H. 
Ulrey, Mgr. 



77 



JEFFERSONVILLE 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

BAKERIES 

JEFFERSONVILLE BAKING CO.; 925 E. 
7th St.; Cumb. 17; "Hoosier Dandy Bread." 

BREWING COMPANIES 
STORZ, MRS. O; F. Fehr, Agent; 130 W. 
Maple; Cumb. 102. 

CANNING FACTORIES 
JEFFERSONVILLE CANNING CO.; Court 
and Wall; Cumb. 51. 

CONFECTIONERIES 

SCHIMPFF, G. A.; 347 Spring; Cumb. 149. 

CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES 
AUSTIN CO., THE; 6th and Missouri Sts.; 
Cumb. 45. 

FOUNDRY AND MACHINE SHOP 

ANDERSON, THE G. S., & CO.; 425 Watt; 
Cumb. 55. 

GROCERIES 

FREDERICK, J. J.; Spring and Riddle; 

Cumb. 799. 
WAHL, MRS. E.; 240 Ohio; Cumb. 121. 
WEIDNER, PETER; Spring and Gravel 

Road; Cumb. 396. 
WHITE & SCHILLER; 1001 E. Chestnut; 

Cumb. 165. 

HAY, GRAIN, MILL FEED, ETC. 
CONROY, M. A.; 7th and Spring; Cumb. 
103. 



HOTELS 

REILLEY HOTEL; 333-337 Spring; Cumb. 
978. 

ICE MANUFACTURERS 

DUFFY ICE CO.; Maple and Graham; Cumb. 
435. 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
YOUNG, WM. G.; 351 Spring; Cumb. 810-F. 

LIVERY STABLES 

WILLIS, EDWARD; bet. Wall and Spring; 
Cumb. 101. 

PLUMBING AND STEAM FITTING 
GOODMAN, JOS., JR.; 244 Spring; Cumb. 
845. 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

FRANK, E. M.; 307 Spring; Cumb. 653. 
WATSON & BAIRD; 309 Spring; Cumb. 5. 

RESTAURANTS 

BOHEMIA CAFE; 449 Spring; Cumb. 448. 

SALOONS 

CAFBHART, J. R.; 302 E. Court; Cumb. 71. 
HERFEL, T.; 433 Spring; Cumb. 170. 
SCHILLER, ROBT.; 959 E. Maple; Cumb. 
536-F. 

UNDERTAKERS 

COOTS, E. M., & SONS; 441 Spring; Cumb. 
21. 



NEW ALBANY BUSINESS 
DIRECTORY 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
THORN, L., & SONS; 424 State; Cumb. 
156 A. 



ATTORNEYS 

SWING, JOHN W.; 516-518 Elsby Bldg.; 

Pearl and Spring Sts.; Home 1293. 
McINTYRE & LOUIS; Lawyers; George B. 

Molntyre and John N. Lewis; 310-313 

Elsby Bldg; Pearl and Spring Sts.; Home 

1818. 

AUTOS AND SUPPLIES 

GWIN MOTOR SALES CO.; Charles B. 
Gwin, Pres. and Treas.; S. E. Cor, Third 
and Market; Both Phones 444. 

WRIGHT PLACE, THE; 236 Vincennes; 
Home 1597. 

BAKERY 

STEIN, N.; 1st and Market; Cumb. 177-A. 
WARJISEE, PETER; 902 E. Eleventh St.; 

Home 1092. 
GONDER'S BAKERY; 501 E. Market St.; 

Home 255-A. 

BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS 

PFEFFER, P. J.; Spring and Vincennes; 
Cumb. 143-A. 

BARBER SHOPS 

WEST, EDW. F.; 204 E. Market St.; Home 
423-A. 

BLACKSMITHS 

MILLER, WM. F., & CO.; General Black- 
smithing and Vulcanizing; First and 
Spring; Home 321. 

BOTTLING WORKS 

RENN, JOE, BOTTLING WORKS; 601 State 
St.; Home 219-A. 

BREWERS 

SOUTHERN INDIANA BREWING CO.; W. 
4th and Spring; Cumb. 85. 



78 



BUTCHERS AND MEAT MARKETS 

MANUS, FRANK, CO.; Pork Packers; 1418 
State St.; Cumb. 304-A; Home 171. 

CANDIES 
INDIANA CANDY CO.; Manufacturers and 
Jobbers of Candies; 414 Pearl St.; Cumb. 
237-A; Home 1664-B. 

DENTISTS 
GREENE, DR. F. C; 317 Bank; Cumb. 307; 
Home 154. 

DRUGGIST 

MILLER, FRANK E.; Oak and Vincennes 
Sts.; Cumb. 275-A; Use Vega-Laxa Con- 
tains Vegetable Drugs that increases the 
secretion of the Gastro Intestinal Canal. 
Price 10 and 25 cents. 

DRY GOODS 

CRANDALL, MISS EIVA; 905 Vincennes; 
Home 1584-A. 

FORGES 
OHIO FALLS IRON & STEEL CO.; New 
Albany, Ind.; Cumb. 465. 

FLORISTS 

BITTMAN, J. G., & SONS; 1601 E. Main; 
Cumb. 558. 

FLOUR 

HARTMAN, LOUIS, & SONS; Pearl and 
Oak; Cumb. 73-A; Home 117; Wholesalers 
of Flour — Pillsbury's Best. 

FOUNDRIES— MACHINE SHOPS, BOILER 

SHOPS AND SHEET IRON SHOPS 
HEGWALD & CO.; State and R. R.; Cumb. 
28. 



FRUIT AND OYSTERS 

SANFORD, C. E.; 107 E. Market; Cumb. 535. 

FLOUR AND FEED 

ZABEL & SON, INCORPORATED; Manu- 
facturers of Flour, Buhr-Meal and Feed; 
Mills, Main St. West of Falling Run; 
Cumb. 76; Home 76; Henry Zabel, Pres. ; 
Tom Thierman, Vice Pres.; Ernest Zabel, 
Sec, Treas. and General Mgr. 

FURNITURE 
HOME FURNITURE & CARPET HOUSE; 

220 Pearl St.; Cumb. 973-Y. 
9HRADER, FRANK L.; 224 State St.; Home 

1142; Dealers. 

GROCERS 

HON, O. S.; 6th and Culberston; Cumb. 604. 

KRBMENTZ, JOSEPH T.; Groceries and 
Meats; 615 Vincennes St.; Home 273; 
Cumb. 536-A. 

LAIB, W. F.; 622 Vincennes; Cumb. 235-A. 

PEOPLES GROCERY; 701 Vincennes St.; 
Jos. C. Belviy, Prop.; Home 1830; Cumb. 
60; Dealer in Good Things to Eat. 

UNCLEBACH, A.; 8th and Culberston; 
Cumb. 62. 

KORB BROS.; Market and State; Home 66; 
Cum. 195-A. 

KREUTZER, H. P., & SON; 263 Ealy; Home 
136; Groceries, Meats and Fresh Vege- 
tables. Prompt and Courteous Service. 

SERMERSHEIM, CARL J.; 527 Oak; Home 
1000. 

NICKEL, EDW.; 1805 Charlestown Road; 
Home 130; Groceries, Meats and Fresh 
Vegetables. Prompt and Courteous Serv- 
ice. 

LOPP, D. J., & SON; Vincennes St. and 
Charlestown Road; Home 883. 



WUNDERLIOH, A., & SONS; Two Stores; 
State and Ealy Sts.; Home 197-A; 501 E. 
Third; Home 164. 

RUOFF, JOHN; 2036 E. Market St.; Home 

440. 
DOUGHERTY, JAMES; 421 E. Main St.; 

Home 1010. 
HON, OSCAR; 800 Vincennes; Cumb. 604; 

Home 205. 
LANG, H. E.; 702 W. Seventh St.; Home 

679. 
LEWIS, H. CARTER; 1111 Chartres St.; 

Home 788; Groceries and Meats. 

BANET & ROBERTS; Floyd Knobs; Home 
16 7- A. 

DEAN, MISS KATE; 142 W. Main St.; Home 
1326. 

DOME, A. W.; 302 W. Main; Home 20. 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 
WEID'MANN, J. F.; Vincennes and Market; 
Cumb. 790. 

GROCERS AND PRODUCE— WHOLESALE 
ZINSMEISTER, FRANK; 319 State; Cumb. 

68. 
CURL, P. N., SONS; 113-17 Main; Cumb. 25. 

GROCERS AND CONFECTIONERS 
DORN, GEO. P.; 1123 Vincennes; Home 
2361-A. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
DETTLTNGER, W. H.; 2109 Ekin Ave.; 
Cumb. 70; Home 70. 

HAY, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

LEE, J. M., & CO.; 628 State St.; Cumb. 
540- A. 



79 



ICE 

CITIZENS ICE DELIVERY CO.; A. P. Bader, 
President; Wholesale and Retail Dealers 
in Artificial Ice; 428 State; Comb. 300. 

ENTERPRISE ICE CO.; 1020 Division; 
Home 1450. 

LUMBER 

HOOSIER PANEL CO.; 505 Elsby Bldg.; 
Pearl and Spring Sts. ; Both Phones 1118. 

MANUFACTURERS 

INDIANA VENEER & PANEL CO.; Hoosier 
Panel Co.; Cumb. 1030. 

MANUFACTURERS, WOOD SPECIALTIES 

KAHLER CO.; Vincennes and Mocon R. R.; 
Cumb. 51. 

MEAT MARKETS 

CASH WHITE HOUSE MEAT MARKET; 
136 E. Market; Cumb. 4G6. 

POULTRY, ETC. 

MUNSTER, .1. W.; 41S State St.; Cumb. 
132-Y. 

MILLINERY 

MILLER, MISS BETTY; 137 E. Spring; 
Home 287-A. 

MODISTES 

KJNOOB, MISS ANNA; 327-28 Elsby Bldg.; 
Pearl and Spring Sts.; Home 2335-A. 

RESTAURANTS 

THE CLUB RESTAURANT; 1G33 E. 
Market; Cumb. 722; Home 35(i. 



SALOONS 

BARNETT, HENRY; 1839 Rear Market; 
Cumb. 340-1 729-A. 

THE K. & I. CAFE; 1619 E. Market; Cumb. 
495; Home 1734. 

BIEL, GUS; Charlestown Road and Silver; 
Home 498-A. 

HEFTON, JAS. E. ; 71G W. Main; Home 332. 

ENDRIS, THEO.; R. R. 2; River Road; 
Home 643-A. 

HARBESON, EDW.; 402 W. Main St.; Home 
752-B. 

HERB, EDW.; 11G W. Main St.; Home 980. 

HESS, T. F.; 416 W. Main St.; Home 1027. 

HOLLAND, GEORGE; 112 W. Market; 
Home 861-A. 

JONES, ALBERT S.; 24 Pearl St.; Home 
1328. 

WATTS & DAILY; 1G34 E. Spring St.; Home 
490. 

ZIEGEUBAUER, R. J.; Fourth and Culbert- 
son; Home 583. 

HUTH, JOSEPH; 1702 E. Main; Home G72. 

LEIST, URBAN; Beeler and Chartres; Home 
1934-A. 

LUETTE, JULIUS E.; 922 Culbertson; Home 
1287. 

SCHARF, P.: 1G43 E. Market St.; Home 
414-A. 

BREEN, JOHN H.; Floyd Knobs; Cumb. 
49G-Z; Home 1173-A. 



SADDLERY AND HARNESS 

KNOOB, GEORGE; Auto Tires and Sup- 
plies; 227 State St.; Home 1483-B. 



STEAM CLEANING WORKS 
INDIANA CLEANING CO.; 206 E. Spring; 
Cumb. 1016-T. 



SEED STORES 

BORNWASSER, H. C, CO.; Implements; 

424-2G State St.; Cumb. 71; Home 1061. 

STEAMBOATS 
KENTUCKY & INDIANA PACKET CO.; 
bet. State and 1st Sts.; Cumb. 94-A; Home 
1246. 

TANNERS AND CURRIERS 
MOSER, GEO. LEATHER CO.; Silver and 
Rear Market; Cumb. 703-A. 

PAINTERS 
TRIBBEY BROS.: Auto and Carriage Paint- 
ing; 214-16 E. Third St.; Home 1977. 

POOL ROOMS 
SICHT. JEFF.; 523 State; Home 678. 



PRODUCE 
SHIREMAN, L. W.; 231 State; Cumb. 303. 

PRODUCE AND COMMISSION 
MILLER, OUBD.; 112 W. Main St.; Home 
S35-B. 



8o 




Aft4CBn 2^- <S?^TOs1 



FIRST REVIEW OF THE ARMY OF SELECTED MEN AT CAMP TAYLOR.